Why is there a © after Bachmannsmile©.

We from Bachmann Orthodontics are responsible for your unique smile.
Our motivation is always to achieve the best result for your individual case.
We are working hard and precise and with state-of-the-art technologies for perfection and your satisfaction. That is why we can give a guarantee for the result — the Bachmannsmile©. Is a quality mark, and you can only get the original at Bachmann Orthodontics.
By the way, it means ©laudia as well. Sorry, Lutz.
Not to forget ©andice. Feel free to call Candice: 09448 1128, and make an appointment to get your perfect Bachmannsmile©.
What can we do to make you smile?

Orthodontic Treatment: 9 Benefits of Straight Teeth

Whether you’re born with straight teeth or paid for a teeth straightening orthodontic treatment such as braces, Invisalign or retainers, straight teeth have a lot of benefits.

Better brushing

Overlapping teeth can trap food particles. Straight teeth allow for easier brushing and flossing. Your teeth will be cleaner and your smile more dazzling.

Clear speech

Did you know that crooked teeth cause many speech impediments? Straight teeth allow clear speech.

Easier eating

Crooked, crowded teeth compromise chewing which may cause digestive problems. This is another reason why orthodontists advise having your teeth straightened.

Less accident-prone teeth

Protruding teeth are more prone to breaking, especially for those who play sports as protective mouth guards may not fit properly.

Fewer headaches

Crowded teeth wear unevenly which puts pressure on a person’s jaw,  often resulting in chronic headaches.

Improved gum health

Gum disease can be very painful as well expensive to treat. People with straight teeth have healthier gums than those with crooked teeth.

Better overall health

Did you know that tooth decay and gum disease are linked to heart disease and high blood sugar? Drs. Lutz and Claudia Bachmann advise getting your teeth straightened to improve your oral hygiene and reduce the risk of tooth decay.

Lower risk of soft tissue injury

Crooked teeth can push against soft tissues in your mouth resulting in cuts, sores and infections. Straight teeth eliminate that risk.

A beautiful smile

One of the biggest benefits of having straight teeth is that it boosts your confidence and makes your smile more beautiful.

Getting your teeth straightened isn’t as daunting as it sounds especially with orthodontic treatments such as invisible braces or Invisalign. These treatments allow you to have your teeth straightened without anyone knowing you’re wearing braces.

Call us to schedule a consultation with North Shore orthodontists, Drs. Lutz and Claudia Bachmann, to discuss what kind of braces will create your beautiful smile.

Enquire about braces > Book a consultation today

Oral Piercings and Braces

Oral piercings and braces are not a good combination. Drs. Lutz and Claudia Bachmann share with their patients the threats oral piercings pose when it comes to oral health and orthodontic appliances.

 ALBANY, AUCKLAND – So, you love your oral piercings. But how do you feel about chipped teeth, receding gum lines and adding months to your orthodontic treatment?

“I love that my patients have all developed their own unique ways of expressing their individuality,” says Lutz Bachmann, a family orthodontist who provides orthodontics for adults and children. “However, I’m not a fan of oral piercings because of the havoc they’re known to wreak on teeth, appliances and health.”

Since the health of our patients and their mouths are what is most important to us, let’s start with the reasons why oral piercings aren’t synonymous with a healthy mouth.

1.)    Infection

Everyone likes to think they have a clean mouth, however, on average “800 to 1,000 different bacteria may call your mouth ‘home,’” says Dr De Vizio of Colgate.

When you get an oral piercing, the open wound gives these bacteria a direct route to your bloodstream.  And playing with and changing the jewellery only introduces more strains into the mouth. A piercing also leaves one more nook for food to get trapped in, providing additional food and breeding ground for bacteria; bed and breakfast for bacteria, if you will.

2.)    Nerve Damage

There are many nerves and blood vessels in the tongue and several ways they can be damaged by piercings. First, if the piercer accidentally hits a nerve or wrong blood vessel, there is a chance you will suffer from numbness or excessive bleeding. Second, if your jewellery gets hung in your braces or anything else, there is always the possibility that it could be ripped from your mouth and result in scarring or nerve damage as well.

3.)    Gum Disease

A large number of people with oral piercings experience gum erosion, which if not stabilized can lead to tooth loss and even death.

“Patients often have an overwhelming urge to play with oral jewellery, but even if they don’t, the gums still incur constant trauma from contact with the lip or tongue ring,” says Dr Claudia Bachmann. “Over time the jewellery wears the gums away, exposing the tooth’s root.”

Once the gums recede, they do not grow back, and the exposed roots make patients prone to gum disease and tooth loss.

“I’ve seen gum recession in patients who have had their piercing for as little as six weeks,” says Dr Lutz. “It happens fast and is especially difficult to spot in cases of tongue piercings since the damage is often isolated to the area behind the teeth. Patients should remove their jewellery at the first sign of erosion and seek treatment which often involves a skin graft if decay or infection hasn’t already occurred.”

4.)    Damaged Teeth

Teeth can be chipped or fractured while eating, talking and even sleeping when there is an oral piercing involved.

“The most common problem we see is patients wanting to chew on their metal barbells or run them across the backs of their teeth like they’re playing a xylophone,” says Dr Claudia. “This constant contact is disastrous for teeth and if a patient falls or their head is jarred while they are chewing on their jewellery it often results in chipping.”

Even the constant drip of water can carve a hole in a stone. So you can only imagine what metal does to a tooth when it is constantly rubbed against it. Enamel does not regenerate itself so when it’s gone patients experience extreme sensitivity, discomfort and possible need for extraction.

 Many pierced patients request Invisalign under the impression that it will protect their teeth from damage. While Invisalign does cover the surface of each tooth, it’s a common misconception that it makes having oral piercings safe. It does nothing to protect the gums from the constant contact and pressure that erodes them permanently, which is the most problematic type of damage caused by piercings.

5.)    Longer Orthodontic Treatment

It’s great if you enjoy wearing braces, but the fact of the matter is that most patients don’t, which is just one more reason why we don’t approve of oral piercings during orthodontic treatment.

While being treated with orthodontics even things as hard as an apple have the potential to dislodge brackets and bend archwires. When the jewellery in your mouth gets hooked to your braces, it can happen so fast that before you know it, you’ve either broken your braces or your jewellery has torn from your tongue or lip, which as you can imagine, is not a pretty sight. Damaged braces or a massive amount of oral trauma has the potential to add months to your orthodontic treatment.

What If You Can’t Give Them Up?

“At Bachmann Orthodontics we are extremely against oral piercings and will not treat a patient unless they agree to remove their oral piercing(s),” says Dr Lutz. “We hope our stand against piercings speaks volumes to their dangers and causes those with piercings or considering them to think twice before subjecting their smile to irreversible damage. You only get one set of adult teeth; we want them to last.”

 

Enquire about braces > Book a consultation today

Proper Brushing

Brush the outer side of your teeth. This is the front side of your teeth that is seen when you smile. Don’t forget to remove the plaque along the part of your tooth closest to the gum line.

Begin on the outside of your top teeth. Bite your teeth together. Rub the toothbrush back and forth across your teeth while gradually moving the toothbrush across your top teeth. Make sure you reach all the way back to your molars. Spit if necessary.

Use small circles to brush the braces. Spend at least 25 – 30 seconds on each bracket. You can also use your interdental brush to brush over the tops of your brackets. Most brackets have holes in them (very hard to see) so try wiggling the interdental brush down into each bracket

Brush the crowns of your teeth. Turn your toothbrush perpendicular to the spaces between your teeth. Rub the brush back and forth and also use a circular motion. This helps get the hard to reach crevices that can harbor plaque and food particles.

Brush the inner side of your teeth. Move the toothbrush back and forth, up and down and then with circular motions on the inside of your top and bottom teeth. When you have braces, the inner side of your teeth are usually the easiest to brush because they are not crowded with braces.

Now brush the outside of your bottom teeth. With your teeth still together, gently brush in circular motions. Make sure you move the toothbrush across all your front teeth and back to the outsides of your molars as well. It may be easier to reach the back of your mouth if you open your mouth a little.